Women Composers
Here you can find all information about our women composers: biographies, lists of their compositions and photos.
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Birthdays

Caroline Ansink
* 08.08.1959 in Amsterdam
Caroline Ansink studied the Flute with Abbie de Quant at the Conservatory in Utrecht and graduated in Musicology in 1986. She also studied Composition with Joep Straesser from 1983 to 1988 and was a pupil of the Korean composer Isang Yun. Her works include chamber and vocal music and compositions for orchestra and choir. Her compositions have won her a number of awards, including prizes at the Gedok competition in Mannheim in 1985 and 1989 and the prize of the Amsterdam Fund for the Arts in 1990. In 1992 the Dutch channel NOS broadcast a TV documentation ”Ik componeer als mens” (I compose music as a human being) featuring Caroline Ansink and the Utrecht composer and singing teacher Catharina van Rennes, who died in 1940. Caroline Ansink was a flutist in the Clara Schumann Orchestra in Cologne, today she lives as a free-lance composer and musician in Amsterdam and teaches at the Conservatory in Utrecht.
Her compositions have won her a number of awards, including prizes at the Gedok competition in Mannheim in 1985 and 1989 and the prize of the Amsterdam Fund for the Arts in 1990. In 1992 the Dutch channel NOS broadcast a TV documentation "Ik componeer als mens" (I compose music as a human being) featuring Caroline Ansink and the Utrecht composer and singing teacher Catharina van Rennes, who died in 1940. Caroline Ansink was a flutist in the Clara Schumann Orchestra in Cologne, today she lives as a free-lance composer and musician in Amsterdam and teaches at the Conservatory in Utrecht. At Furore: LOS for piano, see fue 4660 25 plus piano solo

Compositions:

25 plus piano solo. 27 works by contemporary women composers

Irene Giblin
* 12.08.1888
† 12.05.1974
Irene M. Giblin was raised in Missouri, living much of her life in St. Louis. Having been a good piano student showing a natural talent for the instrument in her adolescence, Irene was first employed as a music demonstrator by Charles Daniels (a.k.a. Neil Moret) at the Grand Leader department store in St. Louis at the tender but eager age of 14.
She was hired to play all of the latest hits from the Jerome Remick catalog, and her sister Gertie was part of the deal, further encouraging people to buy Remick wares. She was later moved to the Stix, Baer & Fuller department store, also in St. Louis, when she was right out of high school at the age of 17. Giblin ended up working five years, missing only a week of work during that entire period. In her positions, playing the piano several hours every day for anyone who wanted to listen to the latest Remick wonders, it was natural for someone of Irene's creativity to also write some of her own works. Over a period of six years Giblin published nine rags, most of them with Remick. As was so often the story, Giblin eventually gave up her composing and performing endeavors, at least professionally, after she married and had her first of two children. Even though she devoted much of the rest of her life to raising a family, Ms. Giblin never stopped her desire for playing the piano. Although she spent much of the Great Depression through World War II without an instrument, her husband procured a Baldwin baby grand for her which she treasured through the rest of her life. Mr. O'Brien passed away in early 1958, just short of their 50th anniversary. As an indication of how hard it was for a woman to have a rag even considered by a publisher in this predominantly male city known for its ragtime, not one of Giblin's pieces was actually published in St. Louis, even though she was its most prolific female composer at that time. This was in part because of her job working with Remick, but it seems that bulk of women composers were published in Kansas City, Chicago or New York. But her music was most certainly heard in St. Louis, as Chicken Chowder was particularly popular with ragtime orchestras. The edition: AUFDERHEIDE, MAY(1888-1972) u. a. Ragtimes fue 1610 ISMN: M-50012-061-2 Aufderheide, May: Dusty & The Thriller!; Giles, Imogene: Red Peppers; Bolen, Grace M.: The Smoky Topaz; Ruddisill, Bess: The Eight O' Clock Rush; Niebergall, Julia Lee: Horseshoe Rag; Giblin, Irene M.: Chicken Chowder; Cozad, Irene: Eatin Time (Kaluza) American women pianists composed numerous ragtime pieces around the turn of the century about three hundred of which have been found and listed in recent years. Eight such pieces are published here; these syncopate rhythms are still as appealing as ever. Those who do not feel like continually practicing wide jumps with their left hand and octaves with their right should look for a partner and play these pieces four hands.

Compositions:

Ragtimes

Memorial days

Corona Schröter
* 14.01.1751 in Guben
† 23.08.1802 in Ilmenau
The lifetime position of court singer that Corona Schröter (1751–1802) held in Weimar after 1776 allowed her artistic independence. Goethe, who had admired her earlier, arranged the appointment and was her close friend and artistic collaborator in the court theater. In the first performance of his Iphigenie auf Tauris (1779), Schröter acted the title role opposite Goethe as Orestes.
She composed the music to his Singspiel Die Fischerin (1782), first performed outdoors at Tiefurt Palace, and sang the role of Dortchen, created specially for her. Her setting of "Erlkönig" from the Singspiel became the first of many settings of this popular ballad. She published this song and one additional Goethe setting in her collection of Fünf und Zwanzig Lieder (twenty-five songs; Weimar, 1786).

Compositions:

Inspired by Goethe. Songs by women composers of the 18.th and 19.th Centuries

Tera de Marez Oyens
* 05.08.1932
† 29.08.1996
graduated from the Amsterdam Conservatory in 1953. Her subjects included piano, violin and conducting. She proceeded to study composition and orchestration with Hans Henkemans and electronic music with Gottfried Koenig at the Institute of Sonology at the University of Utrecht.
She has performed as a concert pianist and has led both children and adults groups in music improvisation. Her activities include conducting amateur and professional choirs and orchestras, producing music program series for radio, and lecturing and writing on music education, group improvisation, and the role of women in music. Her book Working with Modern Sound was published in 1978 by Toorts, Haarlem, the Netherlands. She has also written and lectured about contemporary music at international forums and numerous conservatories and universities. Until 1988 she taught composition at the Conservatory of Zwolle. She is a profilic composer, with well over 200 works to date. They include full orchestral, chamber and electronic works, church and choral music as well as childrens operas. Many of her compositions were commissioned by the Nederlands Ministery of Culture and various broadcasting networks in Germany and the Netherlands. Tera de Marez Oyens has won several prizes in The Netherlands and abroad. In 1989 she was awarded the first prize in a competition for composers in Dublin. http://www.classical-composers.org/cgi-bin/ccd.cgi?comp=marezoye

Compositions:

A Wrinkle in Time
Prazský Hrad (The Prague Castle)
Valalan und Springtal


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