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Francesca Caccini
* 18.09.1587 in Florenz † 1640 in Florenz
Francesca Caccini (Florence, 18.9.1587–? 1640) received her musical training from her father Giulio and gave her first performance as a singer in Florence in 1600. When the Caccini family (father Giulio, stepmother Margherita, sister Settimia and brother Pompeo) were staying at the court of Henry IV in Paris (1604/5), Francesca was offered a position there.
In spite of further attractive offers from the courts of nobles in Rome and Ferrara she remained in Florence and entered the service of the Grand Duke Ferdinando de’Medici in 1607. Francesca Caccini stayed in this city, one of the most important cultural centres of the time, for the rest of her life (with the exception of a period spent in Lucca in the years 1626-1630). It is safe to assume that the Francesca Caccini whose death was recorded in 1640 was the composer herself. The earliest reference to her work as a composer is found in one of her letters (dated 10 September 1606) to the poet Michelangelo Buonarroti, in which she thanks him for the poems sent to her to be set to music. Her first opera La Stiava was performed in 1607. By 1625 she had written at least another 5 stage works (2 of them jointly with Marco da Gagliano): Il passatempo (1614), Il ballo delle Zigane (1615), La fiera (1619), Il martirio di S. Agata (1622) and La liberazione di Rugiero dall’isola d’Alcina (1625). All of them, apart from the last, have been lost without trace. Her only collection of monodies, Il primo libro delle musiche a una e due voci, was published in 1618. Francesca Caccini was one of the finest singers of her day and accompanied herself on the lute or the harpsichord. After her father’s death in 1618 she stood alongside Jacopo Peri as the most important musical figure in Florence.

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Annäherung IX - an sieben Komponistinnen
Il Primo Libro delle musiche

Matilde Capuis
* 01.01.1913 in Neapel † 31.01.2017
Matilde Capuis was born on the first of January 1913 in Naples. When she was a little child, she already developed a strong affinity to music and attracted attention by her first attempts to compose. She studied violin, piano and organ in Florence and Venice. Between 1941 and 1946 she attended composition courses at the Accademia Chigiana in Siena. She was awarded various composition prizes such as the “Premio Quartetto Veneziano” (1948), the “Premio Circolo Universitario”, Bolzano (1948), the “Concorso Internazionale per Compositori”, Genova (1952) and the “Concorso International de Compositoras H. Rubinstein” Buenos Aires (1962).
Matilde Capuis composed works for orchestra and choir, such as a “Sinfonia in sol minore” and an oratorio for soloists, choir and orchestra, “Il Pianto della Madonna”, many songs and a lot of chamber music with a great preference for the human voice and string instruments. Her special preference for the violoncello brought her together with Ugo Scabia, cellist and professor from Turino with whom she should be connected for years by intense concert activities. In 1969, she was offered a professorship for composition and music theory at the Verdi Conservatory in Turino. There she taught up her emeritus status in 1983. In 2001 she was honoured in recognition of her musical merits of the Turin University “Università della Terza Età“ and the city of Turin appointed her to a honorary citizen. Her works are published by the publishing house Furore Verlag. On January 31, 2017 she died, 104 years old, in Turin.

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25 plus piano solo. 27 works by contemporary women composers
Annäherung VII - an sieben Komponistinnen
Breve Dialogo
Brevi Pagine di Musica da Camera per la Gioventu
Concentus brevis
Concentus brevis for oboe and string orchestra
Corale
Dialogo for string orchestra
Due Movimenti
Elegia
IV. Sonate G-Dur
Immagini for Violoncello and Piano
La Nave della Vita/Das Schiff des Lebens
Leggenda per la Notte di Natale
Ouverture
Preludio, Allegro, Fantasia
Sei Miniatures
Sinfonia g-Moll
String Quartet c sharp minor
Tre Momenti
V. Sonate
Variazioni for orchestra

Carmen Maria Cârneci
* 19.09.1957 in Racila Rumänien
From 1976 to1981 Carmen Maria Cârneci studied composition and conducting in Bucharest/Romania. After maticulating, she continued her studies in Freiburg/Germanywith Klaus Huber and Francis Travis, participated in conducting courses with Pierre Boulez, Peter Eötvös and others, and already gained several prizes and awards.
Since 1986 she had numerous conducting engagements: at the Donaueschingen Festival in 1989 and 1992, regular guest conductor at the State Opera and the Chamber Theatre in Stuttgart, where she gave the premiere performance of Salvatore Sciarrino’s “Perseo e Andromeda”, also conducting the first Italian performance at Gibellina, and subsequent performances in Milan. In 1993 she was guest conductor at the “Neues Theater für Musik” in Bonn, where she also gave the premiere of her chamber opera Giacometti in March 1996. From 1990 to1991 she conducted the Freiburg Academic Orchestra; in 1992 she was director of the ”Rossini in Wildbad” festival. While in Freiburg, she also founded the vocal ensemble ”Coloratura”. As a composer, she receives grants, awards and commissions from important institutions and festivals. Since 1994 she has been involved in the administration and program-plannning of the “profectio inititive freiburg” ensemble as conductor and co-organizer. She is currently working as a freelance composer and conductor. She lives in Freiburg and in Bucharest where she teaches at the Music Academy. Despite or because of her split existence since the mid-eighties, living sometimes in Freiburg, sometimes in Bucharest, with all the see-sawing of outlooks and aesthetic perceptions that entails, Carmen Maria Cârneci has drawn back, and made the striving for her own inner truth the central focus of her work. A truth that can only exist and be discovered at the core of the artistically active ego, between past and future, vision and reality, artistic individuality and perceptions of the surrounding world.

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-embER die Stille, ich
25 plus piano solo. 27 works by contemporary women composers
Annäherung VIII - an sieben Komponistinnen
The No-One’s-Rose, Three Songs on lyrics by Paul Celan
O viridissima on a psalm by Hildegard von Bingen
OMENS capriccio
ORIGAMI I. for clarinet in B flat
Omens. Gräser. Schritte.
Omens. Gräser. Schritte.
Origami with Black Birds for Flute solo
REm
SEMANTERION-Toaca for ensemble (sextet)
Sprachrohr - De Sancta Maria
TraumLieder
Christmas Carols by Women Composers Vol. 2
conSolar

Teressa Carreño
* 1853 in Caracas † 1917 in Koblenz
Teresa Carreño was a pianist, composer, singer, and conductor from Venezuela. At age eight she went to the U.S. to study with Louis Moreau Gottschalk. Carreno began her career at age twelve, living in Germany for thirty years. The musician married Emile Sauret, the violinist, in 1872, and performed sonatas with him. She would marry three more times. Carreno composed music for both piano and strings. She spent a few years conducting and singing in an opera company in Venezuela before returning to the piano in 1889.
1889 erster Auftritt in Berlin. In dritter Ehe war sie mit dem 11 Jahre jüngeren Eugen d' Albert verheiratet. Sie dirigierte und komponierte, so z.B. die Nationalhymne von Venezuela. Sie starb 1917 in Koblenz.

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String Quartett b minor (score and parts)

Caroline Carrière
* 1960 in Fribourg † 01.10.2018
Caroline Charrière was born in Fribourg (Switzerland) in 1960, graduated in flute from the Lausanne Conservatory (under Pierre Wavre) and continued her studies with Aurèle Nicolet and at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester (UK). At the same time, she studied orchestration and composition with the Swiss composer Jean Balissat. Since the autumn of 2000, Caroline Charrière has devoted herself mainly to composition. Foto: AWicht
At the beginning of 2017, she won a competition for a one-year stay at the Cité internationale des Arts in Paris, where she intends to devote most of her time to composing a passion. In the summer of 2017, she was awarded second prize for her composition ‘Awakening’ at ‘Aufbruch für zwei Trompeten, Horn, Posaune und Tuba’, an international composition competition for women composers. Her extensive catalogue of works includes instrumental and chamber music as well as choral and orchestral pieces. In addition to her work as a composer, she teaches theory and flute at the Freiburg Conservatory and conducts the women’s choir Choeur de Jade. www.carolinecharriere.ch

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Awakening

Diana Čemerytė
* 1974 in Panevezys/Litauen
Diana Čemerytė made her first attempts at composition at the age of nine. After studying Composition and the Theory of Music at the Conservatory in Vilnius she studied Composition under Osvaldas Balakauskas at the Lithuanian Academy of Music in Vilnius from 1994 to 2000. Since 2003 she has been extending her training by studying Musicology at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main.
Diana Čemerytė has been commissioned to compose a number of pieces and is a regular guest at festivals and concerts of contemporary music in Lithuania and other parts of Europe. Her work includes chamber music, with string quartets, choral music, orchestral works and an opera for children. Diana Cemeryte is currently living in Frankfurt am Main as a free-lance composer and was awarded the scholarship of the Frankfurt Mozart Foundation for 2004. At Furore: STILL for piano, see fue 4660 25 plus piano solo

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25 plus piano solo. 27 works by contemporary women composers
Bild ohne Rahmen
Lamentation
Silhouetten, Schatten, Vision
TePra I-II
Christmas Carols by women composers vol. 1

Cécile Chaminade
* 1857 † 1944
The Parisian composer and pianist Cécile Chaminade contributed more than any other creative musician to the colour of cultural life in the city on the Seine both in the versatility of her means of expression and [in terms of formal diversity] among the composers of the French piano music of the Belle Epoque, comparable most closely to Saint-Saëns and Debussy.
She mastered the classical-romantic sonata form with the same confidence as the theory of the lied or the tonal balance of short character pieces and dances. With more than 200 piano pieces and some 130 songs with piano accompaniment, she composed an oeuvre between around 1880 and 1915 in these two fields alone that ranks as one of the most extensive of the period. What is more important than the quantity of her life's work as a composer, including not only the comic opera “La Sévillane” and the ballet “Callirho딝 but also one concertante piece for piano and orchestra, two piano trios, one concertino for flute and orchestra and a mass, is the quality of her melodic inventiveness. Cécile Chaminade was, as even inconspicuous little pieces in her “Album des Enfants” op. l26 [or chanson-like songs] demonstrate, a bor¬n melodist full of lyrical refinement with a highly developed sense of measure and clarity. Like Mélanie Bonis and Lili Boulanger, the winner of the Rome Prize who died at an early age, she continued the old tradition of typically French transparency [and singability as a whole]. Although she was at times a figure of fun [or even notoriety] as a salon composer, it is no longer possible to imagine Pari¬sian musical life at the turn of the century without Cécile Chaminade. In particular, it is her music for solo piano, with its expression of noblesse and elegance, which has come to epitomise the music of the Belle Epoque and to which she owed her social advancement and long-lasting popularity as a performer mainly of her own works. Cécile Louise Stéphanie Chaminade was born on 8 August 1857 at the foot of the hill of Montmartre in Paris. She was the third of four children, descended on her father's side from a line of offi¬cers and seamen. Her artistically gifted mother was considered a good pianist and a [highly thought-of] singer. It was she who taught the rudiments of music to her daughter, who made her first attempts at composition before she was even ten. When her father, who at that time was the director of an insurance company, bought a property in Le Vésinet in 1863, the young Cécile made the acquaintance there of Georges Bizet. Convinced of the girl's above-average musi¬cal abilities, he lovingly called her "mon petit Mozart". Cécile was taught privately by teachers from the Paris Conservatory, which she was not permitted to attend. She received piano lessons from Félix Le Couppey, and was given violin lessons by Joseph Marsick. She continued her piano training with Antoine Marmontel and studied composition under Benjamin Godard who familiarized her with the classicist currents in French music of the late romantic period. Félix Chaminade's breakthrough as a composer came in 1888 with her greatest works. On 16 March her ballet ”Callirho딝 had such a successful opening night at the Grand Théatre de Marseille that there were more than 200 subsequent performances in the same theatre [and individual pieces taken from the colourful score, such as the ”Pas des Amphores” and the ”Pas des Echarpes”, were soon being printed by American publishers.] On 18 April the ”concertante piece” op.40 for piano and or¬chestra with its brilliantly evocative Spanish elements and her "symphonie dramatique" "Les Amazones" for choirs and large orchestra had an eventful première in Antwerp. Now celebrated as a composer, too, Cécile Chaminade shared with Emmanuel Chabrier and Moritz Moszkowski the Paris publisher Enoch who printed most of her works over a period of several decades and encouraged her to write four-handed arrangements of numerous solo pieces to further the wider distribution of her works. Having already given concerts in Western Switzerland and in Holland, from 1892 onwards Chaminade took particular pleasure in performing in England, where on repeated occasions she was a guest of Queen Victoria at Windsor Castle [for subsequent recreation]. Meanwhile in the USA actual Chaminade Clubs had been established and were insisting upon making the personal acquaintance of the composer of such popular piano pieces as Sérénade op.29 or the lst Arabesque op.6l. In the 1907/08 concert season, Chaminade gave guest recitals of her own compositions in American cities from Boston to St. Louis and in Canada, making 25 appearances and filling concert halls wherever she went. Her husband Louis Matthieu Carbonel, a music publisher from Marseille, had died in 1907. She had married him in Le Vésinet in 1901, but had maintained a certain distance by keeping her residence near Paris. She explained her platonic marriage with the words: ”Quelle désillusion que les mariages d‘artistes, l‘un mange toujours l‘autre” (What a disappointment these artists‘ marriages are - one partner always devours the other). After the loss of her mother in 1911 her first creative crisis began to emerge, continuing after the outbreak of the First World War. Cécile Chaminade stopped composing temporarily, and then, after she had withdrawn from social and cultural life in 1922, her creative outpouring came to an end. By the time of her death on 13 April 1944 in Monte Carlo [where she had retired to in 1936,] she was known to the international music world only for her concertino for flute op.l07. She had written this piece in 1902 at the height of her fame as a compulsory exercise for the Paris Conservatory which had once been closed to her. Cécile Chaminade not only made history in 1913 by becoming the first woman composer to be admitted to the French Legion of Honour, but was also the first European composer to have the honour of being published in America. As early as 1893 the famous New York publisher G. Schirmer issued two anthologies of her songs, followed by two piano albums six years later. The exotic tone colour of dance-inspired bravura pieces such as ”Lolita” and ”Lolita” and ”La Morena”, reminiscent of their fellow countryman Louis Moreau Gottschalk, particularly appealed to the Americans. The selection of works printed here endeavours to present a wide variety in terms of form and content, taking into account, as it does, not only the sonata but also such different expressions of Cécile Chaminade's Parisian spirit as the brilliant concert étude with its Romantic character and the salonesque, playful waltz, the Song without Words of the type introduced by Mendelssohn Bartholdy and the early impressionist, atmospheric ”Poème provençal”, a piece of landscape poetry for piano of an austere and slightly melancholy nature. In all of these samples of this extravagantly wide-ranging body of works for piano [by a musician constantly alternating between the salon and the concert hall] one is aware of a manner of composition that is attuned to the instrument in every detail and feeds on the composer's own experience, and although it does not lack profundity, it subordinates such qualities to a light-footed, [at times superficially] humorous elegance which became her trademark at an early stage with the minuet op.5 and other dances [from her early works]. The Etude pathétique op.l24 with its great dynamic diversity, ranging from piano to triple forte, combines energetic playing style with enchantingly delicate lyrical passages to be performed dolcissimo. In its highly cantabile middle voice, the concert étude Automne op..35 No.2 uses one of the formal devices introduced by the Romantic piano virtuoso Sigismond Thalberg, while the agitated middle section, with its [toccata-like] rotating chords, points ahead to the ”Soirée dans Grenade” from Debussy’s ”Estampes” composed in 1903. This model of harmony [par excellence] written in the warm tones of D flat major is closer to the expressive range of Rachmaninov than to the classicism, dominated at that time by Saint-Saëns, which suggests itself in the Mendelssohn-like scherzo sections of the étude Fileuse op.35 No.3. Dedicated to Ossip Gabrilovich, the St.Petersburg-born pianist and conductor, Etude romantigue op.l32 was first published in 1909 and follows Valse Caprice op.33, a waltz liberally interspersed with chromatics and pleasing in its playful spirit. In the fanfare-like introduction the composer quotes a motif from Chopin's Polonaise op.53 and goes on to remind us again of the master of the concert waltz with an elegantly swaying waltz theme. Together with the Six Etudes de Concert op.35 (1886), the Sonata in C minor op.2l, dedicated to her brother-in-law Moritz Moszkowski, is not only one of Cécile Chaminade's main works but is also one of the most important French works in this genre in the second half of the 19th century. Undoubtedly composed at an earlier date but first published in 1895, this sonata draws on classical, romantic and baroque models, unifying stylistic elements from Beethoven, Schumann and Chopin with those of J. S. Bach to create a whole that nevertheless ultimately shows the very characteristic hand of Cécile Chaminade in the abundance of its splendidly cantabile passages. The expressive fugato in the main theme, with its dramatic surges and passionate outbursts, underlines the composer's mastery of counterpoint to the same extent as the lyrical middle section of the slow movement shows her melodic inventiveness. She included the finale, which she had composed as a kind of perpetuum mobile with toccata-like features, unchanged and entitled Appassionato as No.4 in the Six Etudes de Concert op.35 after the sonata had ceased to be reprinted. Walter Labhart Translation: Holger Klier see also CD siehe CD SAL 7013

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Annäherung X
pian é forte. Music for piano

Rebecca Clarke
* 1886 in Harrow, England † 1979
Rebecca Clarke, composer and violist Rebecca Clarke (1886-1979) was born in Harrow, England to an American father and a German mother. Educated at London's Royal College of Music, she studied composition with Sir Charles Stanford; she was his first woman student. Clarke had a long career as a professional violist; in 1913 she was one of the first women to be admitted to the Queen's Hall Orchestra.
She achieved fame as a composer with her Viola Sonata (1919) and Piano Trio (1921), both written for competitions sponsored by Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge. Throughout the twenties Clarke steadily wrote chamber music and songs, much of it for her fellow performers. Based in London from 1924 to 1939, Clarke toured extensively, performed with a number of ensembles, and broadcast over the BBC. She spent the years of World War II in the U.S. 1939 to 1941 was another period of compositional productivity. In 1944 she married pianist James Friskin, who had been a fellow student at the Royal College, and settled in New York, where she lived until her death at age 93. While she achieved some recognition as a composer in her lifetime, Clarke often felt conflicted about composing. Issues including her use of the pseudonym "Anthony Trent" in 1918 for her (still unpublished) piece "Morpheus for Viola and Piano", and difficulty in finding publishers for her music (even after the success of her Viola Sonata) illustrate some of the ways that gender affected her career trajectory and self-image as a composer. Her life story, in many ways a poignant one, offers insight on a creative woman whose greatest successes are her compositions themselves, even those that still await to be discovered. More information see: www.rebeccaclarke.org/

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Annäherung XII - an sieben Komponistinnen XII
Christmas Carols by Women Composers Vol. 3

Aude Clesse
* 1980 in Thionville/Frankreich
Aude Clesse stammt aus Frankreich und gewann 2017 den 3. Preis beim Kompositionswettbewerb "Aufbruch" für Blechbläserquintett.
Mit zehn Jahren lernte sie Klavier am Konservatorium de Musique d‘Eschsur-Alzette (Luxemburg). Mit 24 Jahren fing sie an, Saxophon zu spielen. Nach mehreren Jahren Studium des musikalischen Schreibens, einschließlich Harmonie, Kontrapunkt und Fuge am Konservatorium in Esch-sur-Alzette, wurde sie in die dortige Kompositionsklasse aufgenommen. Sie studierte außerdem an der Universität Metz (Frankreich) Musikwissenschaft. Neben ihrer kompositorischen Tätigkeit unterrichtet sie Klavier und Musiktheorie an mehreren Musikschulen in Frankreich.

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Bric à brac

Gloria Coates
* 1938 in Wausau, Wisconsin
Gloria Coates erhielt bereits mit zwölf Jahren den renommierten Kompositionspreis der ‚National Federation of Music Clubs/Junior Division'. Sie machte ihre Master- und post graduate Studien in Komposition an der Louisiana State University und an der Columbia University in New York.
Gloria Coates’ Œuvre umfasst nahezu alle Bereiche der Musik: von Orchesterwerken, darunter 14 Symphonien - keine Komponistin hat bislang so viele Symphonien geschrieben - bis hin zu Elektronischer Musik. Ihre Werke erhielten zahlreiche Preise (u. a. die Internationale Koussevitzki Auszeichnung) und werden weltweit auf Großen Festivals (z. B. Warschauer Herbst, Musica Viva, New Music America) aufgeführt.

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25 plus piano solo. 27 works by contemporary women composers
Annäherung XIII

Maria Rosa Coccia
* 04.06.1759 in Rom † 1833 in Rom
Maria Rosa Coccia wurde am 4. Juni 1759 in Rom geboren. Ihre Eltern stammten beide aus der Nähe Roms, die Mutter Maria Angiola Luzi aus Castel Gandolfo, der Vater Antonio Coccia, ein Apotheker, aus Velletri.
Mit acht Jahren zeigt sich bei ihr eine so große Musikalität, die sich im Singen - solfeggiare all' improvviso', einer kunstvollen, textlosen Gesangstechnik ausdrückt, sowie eine staunenswerte Fertigkeit im Umgang mit dem Notensystem - "tutte le chiavi musicali giunse a conoscere" -, dass der Vater für einen Musiklehrer sorgt, bei dem das Kind Unterricht in Cembalo und Gesang bekommt. Ihre Fortschritte sind so immens, daß der Lehrer ihr bald nichts mehr beibringen kann, so wird berichtet. Dabei ist die Rede von achtständigem Üben des Kindes.

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Annäherung XIII
Dixit Dominus Domino meo
Magnificat

Irene B. Cozad
* 1888 in Lineville Iowa † 02.08.1970
Irene Cozad was born in Lineville, Iowa, but came to prominence in the Kansas City area. She reportedly played piano with the Kansas Symphony and prior to the publication of her two rags was listed in the city directory as a music teacher. While Cozad married J. Whitman Sherer, M.D., in 1912, her compositions did not entirely stop.
A few songs appeared up through 1920, including Kansas City Town which won her a $100.00 prize in a contest sponsored by the Million Population Club. She spent later years living with her children in the house the family had owned for a number of decades, even as recently as 1988.

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Ragtimes

Chiara Margarita Cozzolani
* 27.11.1602 in Mailand † 1677
Margarita Cozzolani kam am 27. November 1602 in Mailand als Tochter einer wohlhabenden Familie zur Welt. Bereits als Jugendliche trat sie in das renommierte Benediktinerkloster St. Radegonda ein, wo sie 1620 die Ewige Profess ablegte und den Ordensnamen Chiara Margarita annahm. In den Jahren 1658-60 und 1672-73 ist sie als Äbtissin, 1664 und 1671 als Priorin des Klosters verzeichnet.
No description available!

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Annäherung XI

Andrea Csollány
* 1964 in Sindelfingen
Andrea Csollány studied piano in Mannheim, majoring in music theory (Prof. Hermann Schäfer) and aural training. She went on to do further studies in piano and composition with Dimitri Terzakis and Wolfgang Rihm, among others. Since 1986 she has been teach- ing piano, chamber music, music theory (preparatory course for university studies) and composition at the Municipal School of Music in Mannheim. She has also held a special teaching post for aural training and arrangement at the Mannheim Musikhochschule since 1993.
In addition, she gives performances in the field of New Music and is interested in the music of other cultures. To this day Andrea Csollány remains active as a composer, arranger and teacher. The song “Szüz Mária” is an old Hungarian folk song for which Andrea Csollány has arranged a piano accompaniment. The German translation of the old Hungarian text was written by her mother Maria Csollány.

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25 plus piano solo. 27 works by contemporary women composers
Christmas Carols by women composers vol. 1
Christmas Carols by Women Composers Vol. 2

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