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Wilhelmine von Bayreuth
* 1709 † 1758
Wilhelmine von Bayreuth and her musically knowledgeable husband, Margrave Friedrich (1711–1763), not only provided for splendour in their Franconian residence in the form of new stage sets, but also ensured an interesting and original programme. Although Friedrich appeared to appreciate the entertainment muse more than that of great opera, Wilhelmine was clearly the sponsor of “opera seria”. Thus, after chamber music that was initially more in the French style at the start of the reign of the Margrave and his lady in 1735, Italian “dramma per musica”, whose exponents were primarily castrati and primadonnas from the south, became established in Bayreuth from 1737 onwards.
Adopting Italian musical theatre was a logical step for Wilhelmine: as heir to the throne she had already staged secular cantatas with ballet on mythological subjects (texts and music have been lost), thereby following on from the performances of her grandmother Sophie Charlotte, Queen of Prussia. Later, with the help of Italian opera companies, she adopted the Italian singing style by first composing a pastoral which was performed in the summer/autumn of 1738 in Bayreuth/Erlangen(?). That she wrote both the libretto and the music is apparent from a letter written by her brother. Researchers now agree that the libretto of her (sole completely preserved) opera seria L’Argenore from 1740 can only have originated from Wilhelmine herself. As a royal princess and daughter of a “great king” (Friedrich Wilhelm I.), an awareness of being a part of the very world history from which operatic material was derived in the Baroque period obviously gave her the greatest motivation for this. Her further opera compositions demonstrated a logical progression in the development and philosophical appraisal of her own past and experiences. If we compare Wilhelmine’s surviving compositions with the much more extensive musical works of her brother Frederick the Great we are inevitably left with the impression that the greater part of her music must have been lost. Even in their youth in Berlin, brother and sister were virtually in competition to see who could write more music and later in Bayreuth Wilhelmine the composer initiated operas and concerts at court. Both from her time in Berlin and in Bayreuth, therefore, much more of her music should have survived. In particular we have absolutely no information about the content and programmes of the “Academies” held regularly at the Academie der freyen Künste und Wissenschaften (Academy of the Free Arts and Sciences) founded in Bayreuth in 1756, to which Wilhelmine devoted much of her musical energies in the last two years of her life. Several opera librettos written by her have been preserved, both autograph and as printed copies, but only three of her musical compositions have gradually come to light and been published. Some years ago Furore first published her harpsichord concerto. This concerto must be one of the earliest original clavier concertos. It shows that Wilhelmine was not only a virtuoso harpsichordist, but that she was able to make a highly individual contribution to the genre at an early stage in her musical career.

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Annäherung IX - an sieben Komponistinnen
Cavatinen
Concerto in G
Concerto in G (set of parts)
Sonata per Flauto traverso e Basso continuo

Vally Weigl
* 11.09.1894 in Wien † 25.12.1982 in New York
Vally Weigl belonged to a Jewish merchant family from Vienna. Between 1913 and 1918 she studied musicology, music teaching, psychology and philosophy in her home city and took private lessons to acquire additional musical skills in piano playing, music theory and composition. She was a pupil of Richard Robert and Karl Weigl whom she later married. Due to the persecution resulting from the Nuremberg Race Laws she fled with her family to the USA where she worked as a pianist and music teacher.
Her Old Time Burlesque composed in 1937 was originally scored for either the cello or trombone with piano. The warm tone of the viola lends the work a fascinatingly wistful timbre.

Werke:

Miriam's Song (Volume 1)

Dorothy Williams
Dorothy Williams served on the music faculty at several colleges, and as staff and recital accompanist at Eastman School of Music. She is organist at Mayfl ower Community Congregational Church, and has collaborated on compositions and performances with Calliope Women’s Chorus, One Voice Mixed Chorus, and TransVoices. She has two children and six grandchildren, and lives in St. Paul, Minnesota.
No description available!

Werke:

Positive

Emma Wooge
* 02.04.1857 in Hamburg † 13.04.1935
There are little informations about the life of Emma Wooge. She was born in Hamburg, April the 2nd 1857, and died in Berlin, April the 13th 1935. Her musician teachers were Eduard Behm and Richard J. Eichberg. From 1880 to 1882 she had an engagement as mezzo-soprano at the Hamburger Staatstheater. Since 1883 she sang at Darmstadt, afterwards Wooge was a member of the ensemble of the Staatstheater at Leipzig. She removed to Berlin, where she began a teaching career and was very successful. Wooge composed duets and songs for voice and piano and also some sacred works.
No description available!

Werke:

Christmas Carols by Women Composers Vol. 2

Mary Wurm
* 18.05.1860 in Southampton † 21.01.1938 in München
British pianist, conductor and composer of German parentage. Mary Wurm was born in Southampton, May 18, 1860 and died in Munich, January 21, 1938. She studied the piano and composition at the Stuttgart Conservatory and later became a piano pupil of Clara Schumann. She studied composition in London, winnig the Mendelssohn Stipend three times in succession. In 1886 she continued composition studies in Leipzig. Germany was her home for most of her life. In Berlin she established a women’s orchestra, with wich she conducted and toured until 1900.
No description available!

Werke:

Christmas Carols by Women Composers Vol. 2

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